Planet of My Dreams-Part 3

Every November, millions of monarch butterflies arrive at the Oyamel fir forests in central Mexico, where they migrate to survive through the winter. Or at least that’s what’s supposed to happen.
In recent years, however, scientists have noticed a disturbing trend: The number of butterflies migrating to Mexico has been dropping sharply. In 2012, just 60 million monarchs arrived at their overwintering habitats, a record low. And fresh data from WWF Mexico suggests that the current winter’s numbers are even lower — down to just 33 million butterflies across 0.67 hectares (1.65 acres). It seems Monsanto spraying pesticides kills milkweeds. The Butterflies main food source.
Now in the South specifically within large factory farm operations that collectively raise most of the state’s 10 million hogs… and their 40 million daily gallons of untreated manure. Sadly, North Carolina has one of the oldest and worst ways of disposing of hog waste: they use manure lagoons and sprinkler systems, which presents a serious threat to public health. The state passed a legislative measure in 2007 that asked factory farm operations to voluntarily phase out their old practices and improve their quality standards for air and water. But it shouldn’t be surprising to learn that, when something is voluntary, industry doesn’t usually do it. So far only a few factory farms have implemented the new systems. It’s time for North Carolina to make these standards mandatory.

Due to the confined spaces that typify the factory farm model of raising hogs, and due their heavy reliance on antibiotics, artificial hormones and other chemicals to promote fast growth, the mammoth amounts of manure that hogs produce each day have become a public health hazard and an environmental disaster to residents of North Carolina.
Specifically within large factory farm operations that collectively raise most of the state’s 10 million hogs… and their 40 million daily gallons of untreated manure. Sadly, North Carolina has one of the oldest and worst ways of disposing of hog waste: they use manure lagoons and sprinkler systems, which presents a serious threat to public health. The state passed a legislative measure in 2007 that asked factory farm operations to voluntarily phase out their old practices and improve their quality standards for air and water. But it should not be surprising to learn that, when something is voluntary, industry doesn’t usually do it. So far only a few factory farms have implemented the new systems. It’s time for North Carolina to make these standards mandatory.

Due to the confined spaces that typify the factory farm model of raising hogs, and due their heavy reliance on antibiotics, artificial hormones and other chemicals to promote fast growth, the mammoth amounts of manure that hogs produce each day have become a public health hazard and an environmental disaster to residents of North Carolina.

The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Duke Energy have been ordered by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Raleigh to turn over all relevant emails, memos and reports from 2010 through the Feb. 2 spill.

In Michigan more than 80,000 tons of coal ash and 27 million gallons of contaminated water spewed into the Dan River, according to the Associated Press — enough to fill 73 Olympic-sized pools. It was the third largest coal ash spill in U.S. history.
Enbridge Inc.’s pipeline ruptured on July 26 and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given the company until Sept. 27 to clean up the surface oil and oiled soil and vegetation along the river.

But even when the cleanup is finished, something will be left behind: an estimated 9 million cubic yards of river soil, sediment and floodplain material laden with harmful polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, the remnant of paper production and recycling companies that operated along the river in the 1950s and 1960s. The contamination prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate an 80-mile stretch of the river a federal Superfund site in 1990.

In West Virginia Freedom Industries’ release of the chemical 4-methylcyclohexane methanol into the into the Elk River. The release was a short distance from West Virginia-American Water Company’s intake facility, and contaminated the water supply totens of thousands of West Virginia residences and businesses in Kanawha, Putnam, Boone, Jackson, Lincoln Roane, Clay and Logan counties (and the Culloden area of Cabell County). According to the West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources, 4-methylcyclohexane methanol is a hazardous material that can cause severe burning in throat, severe eye irritation, non-stop vomiting, trouble breathing or severe skin irritation such as skin blistering.
Although they are trying to say the Rivere is OK, residents still smell a liqourice sent from drinking water.

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